Dear Mrs. Eason…

Dear Jen,

In January, just when I thought Room 204 couldn’t possibly get any better, you walked in the door as our new student teacher.

I remember telling the children that student teaching is a threshold and that it was a privilege  for us to  join hands to help you jump across that threshold to become a teacher.   You’ve jumped and here is how I know:

Teaching is noticing the new shoes. Honoring the birthday. Celebrating the new. Marking the old. Wishing away the hurt.  Living the moment. Loving the moment. Teaching is blessing the light and cursing the dark.  Seeing the student.  Inspiring the learner.  Passing on the story of our world.

Teaching is an act of radical hospitality where your action shouts the message: You are welcome here.  You’ve got this.  You can do more.  You belong.  You make a difference.

Learning needs a witness. Teaching is stepping forward: “Here I am…I’ll be your witness.”

A teacher helps children know the difference between the right answer on a test and the right thing to do.  A teacher shows students that nothing is harder than taking the easy way out –and celebrates academic risk with academic support.

A teacher shows children how to command respect by demanding it.  A teacher shows children how to sit a little straighter and stand a little taller—that attentiveness is a life skill.

A teacher is worthy of the trust and love of her students.  And then a teacher is trusted and loved into realness.

On Friday, trusted and loved into a real teacher, you will be done with student teaching.  In Room 204, we know how lucky we are that we got to be the ones to help you jump! And I will always be proud to have been part of the process.

Love,

Annie Campbell

About Annie Campbell

Annie Campbell is a National Board Certified third grade teacher and loves her work. She especially enjoys teaching children how to be enthusiastic readers, writers, and problem solvers. Every year, she hopes to inspire her students to be committed citizens who know they can make a difference in the world around them. When she is not teaching, Annie enjoys cooking for family and friends; she likes to lose herself in a good book; she loves discovering new ideas, restaurants, perfect picnic places, and movies with her husband, Ben.
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7 Responses to Dear Mrs. Eason…

  1. Aimee says:

    Oh! I am totally crying! What a lovely testament to a job well-done by your student teacher!

    Last year I actually had to fire a student teacher, what I wouldn’t give to have one like yours.

    Thanks for sharing…

  2. Lennye says:

    It is almost time for my student teacher to leave as well. I’m really sad. I love the line where you say, “A teacher helps children know the difference between the right answer on a test and the right thing to do.” I’ve got another two weeks with mine and then she is going to proctor our high stakes testing with me.

  3. Blink says:

    This is my favorite line, too: A teacher helps children know the difference between the right answer on a test and the right thing to do.
    I’m going to share with faculty… a thought we can all keep in mind as we are rushing through assessments!

  4. T-Dawg says:

    Lovely post. I have an awesome student teacher who is doing a great job. She will really be missed when she leaves next month. Thanks for the beautiful writing…
    ~T-Dawg

  5. Cathy says:

    I love the way you started sentences with verbs. What a beautiful post!!! I’ll be marking it to reread as days go by and to the style myself.

  6. Jen says:

    Wow. Student teaching with you has been a profound life gift for which I am incredibly grateful. But to be the subject of your blog?! That runs a close second! If I can be half the teacher you are, I will be happy. You are an amazing woman.

  7. Absolutely beautiful…a mother of two college students. And a “step-aunt” of Jen….I know exactly how lucky you are to have her in your midst. Just amazing.

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