It’s Hip to Be Square

homerschoolLast year I saw Winslow Homer’s Country School at an art gallery in St. Louis; now a poster of the painting hangs in Room 204.  That teacher in the one room schoolhouse and I are in the same business.  We know that children are not all the same and they don’t all learn at the same rate.  Children have different readiness levels and different gifts. They need different approaches to master the material at hand.  She knows, as I know, that children can help each other. We are a community of learners. We need each other.

These are just some of the old fashioned ideas out there that are too hip to go away.  The current contemporary talk of standards, accountability, and assessment pedals fast in our media, but there is something about the conversation that doesn’t make sense.   Don’t get me wrong.  I’m all for standards, accountability, and assessment; those think-tank words are ideas that can help us see and tackle complicated issues. But the language of “policy talk” does not teach or inspire or illuminate the path of creative critical thought for children. Policy is not practice.

In 1871, as Winslow Homer  put the finishing touches on the teacher standing in her schoolroom, there was a 12 year old boy in Vermont who would grow up to think and name how we can make education more effective through practice.  His name was John Dewey and he is considered to be the father of “hands-on” learning. He was passionate about inquiry-based learning and schools as creative communities that foster informed citizenship. People have been writing intelligently about how children learn best ever since.

Right now a lot of people are writing about how to best test state standards in order to measure Annual Yearly Progress.  That’s important, too.  It’s just not the same thing.

About Annie Campbell

Annie Campbell is a National Board Certified third grade teacher and loves her work. She especially enjoys teaching children how to be enthusiastic readers, writers, and problem solvers. Every year, she hopes to inspire her students to be committed citizens who know they can make a difference in the world around them. When she is not teaching, Annie enjoys cooking for family and friends; she likes to lose herself in a good book; she loves discovering new ideas, restaurants, perfect picnic places, and movies with her husband, Ben.
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4 Responses to It’s Hip to Be Square

  1. parkerspoets says:

    John Dewey’s writings should be on any teachers book list. Learning through hands-on experience is a powerful kind of learning that works well with other modes of instruction in a mix that touches all learning styles. A few notables have chimed in about experience as well:

    “Experience is the teacher of all things” -Julius Caesar

    “The only source of knowledge is experience” -Albert Einstein

    And finally from the man himself:

    “The belief that all genuine education comes about through experience does not mean that all experiences are genuinely or equally educative.”
    -John Dewey

  2. Abbie says:

    just read all of “Parker’s Poets”…
    go ‘head boys!

  3. lisa mitchell says:

    teach, teach, teach….AYP, AYP, AYP…! Just give me a few children, a few hours in the day and my best energies and watch meaning be made! I am so grateful for your eloquence and dedication..gives teachers a bit of needed polish!

  4. “Right now a lot of people are writing about how to best test state standards in order to measure Annual Yearly Progress. That’s important, too. It’s just not the same thing.”

    Outrageously true!

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